Machu Picchu

Peru Machu Picchu Ruins Mountains Peru Inca
Machu Picchu.jpg Inside Mapi

Peru · Machu Picchu

“Machu Picchu is a trip to the serenity of the soul, to the eternal fusion with the cosmos; where we feel our fragility. It is one of the greatest marvels of South America. A resting place of butterflies in the epicentre of the great circle of life. One more miracle.” – Pablo Neruda, The Heights of Machu Picchu.

Located 120 kilometers northwest of Cusco, the Inca city of Machu Picchu lay hidden from the world in dense jungle covered mountains until 1911. This ‘Lost City’ is one of the world’s archaeological jewels and is one of South America’s major travel destinations. This ancient city was never revealed to the conquering Spaniards and was virtually forgotten until the early part of the 20th century.

Machu Picchu sits high above the Vilcabamba Valley on a long narrow mountain ridge. It is split into two sectors of roughly equal size, the Agricultural Sector and the Urban Sector. Limited by the shape of the ridge upon which Machu Picchu is built, the layout of the site is long (north to south) and thin (east to west).

The well preserved ruins of Machu Picchu seem to almost cling to the steep hillside, surrounded by towering green mountains overlooking the Vilcanota River Valley.

The approximately 200 structures making up this outstanding religious, ceremonial, astronomical and agricultural centre are set on a steep ridge, crisscrossed by stone terraces. Following a rigorous plan the city is divided into a lower and upper part, separating the farming from residential areas, with a large square between the two.

To this day, many of Machu Picchu’s mysteries remain unresolved, including the exact role it may have played in the Incas’ sophisticated understanding of astronomy and domestication of wild plant species.

The massive yet refined architecture of Machu Picchu blends exceptionally well with the stunning natural environment, with which it is intricately linked. Numerous subsidiary centres, an extensive road and trail system, irrigation canals and agricultural terraces bear witness to longstanding, often on-going human use. The rugged topography making some areas difficult to access has resulted in a mosaic of used areas and diverse natural habitats. The Eastern slopes of the tropical Andes with its enormous gradient from high altitude “Puna” grasslands and Polylepis thickets to montane cloud forests all the way down towards the tropical lowland forests are known to harbour a rich biodiversity and high endemism of global significance. Despite its small size the property contributes to conserving a very rich habitat and species diversity with remarkable endemic and relict flora and fauna.

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